Motivation among Health Care Workers in Tanzania: a Case Study of Public and Private Hospitals

Iswante , Matilda Martin (2008) Motivation among Health Care Workers in Tanzania: a Case Study of Public and Private Hospitals. Masters thesis, The Open University of Tanzania.

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Abstract

In Tanzania access to health care is relatively widespi. considerable bypassing of services; questions have beer. improve functionality. The aim of this study was to explore health workers working in the health care facilities in both pub! hospitals in Tanzania, in terms of their motivation to work, satisfa frustration, and to identify areas for sustainable improvement to the services provide. Experience and the evidence suggest that any comprehensive strategy maximize health worker motivation in a developing country context has to involve a mix of financial and non-financial incentives. This study assesses the role of both financial and non-financial incentives for motivation. The study design entailed semi-structured qualitative interviews with doctors and nurses from public, private hospitals. The selection of health professionals was the result of a layered sampling process. For further contextual information, interviews with civil servants in the Ministry of Health and at the district level were carried out. The interview material was coded and quantitative data was analysed with SPSS software. The discussion highlights the context of some of the problems identified in the results and suggests that some of the preferences presented by the health workers be discussed at policy level with a view to adding value to most services with minimum additional resources. HRM tools can uphold and strengthen the professional ethos of doctors and nurses. This entails acknowledging their professionalism and addressing professional goals such as recognition, career development and further qualification. It must be the aim of human resources management/quality management In Tanzania access to health care is relatively widespread, yet there is evidence of considerable bypassing of services; questions have been raised about how to improve functionality. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of health workers working in the health care facilities in both public and private hospitals in Tanzania, in terms of their motivation to work, satisfaction and frustration, and to identify areas for sustainable improvement to the services they provide. Experience and the evidence suggest that any comprehensive strategy to maximize health worker motivation in a developing country context has to involve a mix of financial and non-financial incentives. This study assesses the role of both financial and non-financial incentives for motivation. The study design entailed semi-structured qualitative interviews with doctors and nurses from public, private hospitals. The selection of health professionals was the result of a layered sampling process. For further contextual information, interviews with civil servants in the Ministry of Health and at the district level were carried out. The interview material was coded and quantitative data was analysed with SPSS software. The discussion highlights the context of some of the problems identified in the results and suggests that some of the preferences presented by the health workers be discussed at policy level with a view to adding value to most services with minimum additional resources. HRM tools can uphold and strengthen the professional ethos of doctors and nurses. This entails acknowledging their professionalism and addressing professional goals such as recognition, career development and further qualification. It must be the aim of human resources management/quality management (HRM/QM) to develop the work environment so that health workers are enabled to meet their personal and the organizational goals.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: 600 Technology > 658 Gerneral management
Divisions: ?? 15 ??
Depositing User: Mr. Administrator OUT
Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2011 13:03
Last Modified: 18 Jun 2013 09:00
URI: http://repository.out.ac.tz/id/eprint/123

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