The Effects of Socio-Cultural Factors on Maternal Death in Tanzania: A Case of Makete District Njombe Region

Kiluswa, Judith (2014) The Effects of Socio-Cultural Factors on Maternal Death in Tanzania: A Case of Makete District Njombe Region. Masters thesis, The Open University Of Tanzania.

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of socio-cultural factors on maternal death in Tanzania with particular focus on Makete district in Njombe .region. The study attempted to answer the following questions: What are the social factors that contribute to maternal death in rural areas of Tanzania? What are the cultural factors that contribute to maternal deaths in rural areas of Tanzania? What is the women’s level of decision-making on issues that can control maternal mortality? The study was conducted among child-bearing women, health workers and village leaders in four wards of Makete District. Their selection was done using random sampling techniques and purposive sampling techniques. The study included both qualitative and quantitative data which were obtained through in-depth interviews, interviews, focus group discussions and direct observation methods. Regarding various social factors contributing to maternal mortality, the findings indicated that, women inability to make decisions on family planning use, women lack of decisions to go to the hospital during labour and women inability to decide to .attend ante-natal clinic can be the source of maternal death. On the other hand, women lack of decisions on eating nutritious food and women lack of decision-making on child bearing are cultural factors which can contribute to maternal death., Concerning women’s level of decision-making on issues that can control maternal death, the findings indicated that, women level of decision-making in Makete district is low. Due to low level of women decision-making on various matters, its effects revealed include limited ante-natal clinic attendance (87%), early marriages (81%), bearing many children (74%), delays required care (61%), poor nutritious food (60%) and early child bearing (60%) were mentioned to have effects on maternal mortality.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: 300 Social Sciences > 360 Social services; association
Divisions: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Department of Sociology and social work
Depositing User: Mr Habibu V. Kazimzuri
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2016 10:51
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2016 10:51
URI: http://repository.out.ac.tz/id/eprint/1188

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