Entomological and Anthropological Factors for Persisting High Malaria Transmission in Ruangwa, District Lindi Region Tanzani.

. Clement, Godfrida R. R (2020) Entomological and Anthropological Factors for Persisting High Malaria Transmission in Ruangwa, District Lindi Region Tanzani. ["eprint_fieldopt_thesis_type_phd" not defined] thesis, The Open University of Tanzania.

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Abstract

High malaria prevalence remains a major problem, despite high coverage rates of malaria control interventions. The main objective of the study was to determine entomological and anthropological factors responsible for high malaria transmission in Ruangwa district. Human Landing Catches was used to collect mosquitoes indoors and outdoors. Observation and interview were employed to estimate the proportion of human exposure. Resistance level to insecticides in An. gambiae s.l was evaluated using a standard WHO Susceptibility Test Kit. Out of 2,532 female mosquitoes collected, malaria vectors constituted 26.6 %. An. gambiae complex s, An. gambiae s.s 43 % (n=297) and An. arabiensis 40% (n=278) were speciated by PCR. In the An. funestus group, only An. funestus s.s 1% (n=6) was identified. High abundance of Anopheles mosquitoes was observed in rainy season 553 (95.18%) as compared to dry season 28 (4.82%). Outdoor rate of human bite per person per hour was high 58.02% while for indoors it was 37.10. The leading human exposure activity was evening chatting. Bendiocarb showed (75%), Deltamethrine (95%), Permethrin (97%), and Fenitrothion (96% mortality rate in An.gambiae s.l An.gambiae s.s and An.arabiensis species are responsible for high malaria prevalence. An. coustani has epidemiological implication. Nocturnal outdoor activities increase human-vector interaction. Insecticides were less effective against An. gambiae s.l. The findings provide useful information for future innovative and effective malaria control strategies in the district. Keywords: Malaria Prevalence, Malaria Vectors, Anthropological Factors, Insecticide Resistance, Ruangwa District

Item Type: Thesis (["eprint_fieldopt_thesis_type_phd" not defined])
Subjects: 500 Science > 570 Life sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Sciences Technology and Environmental Studies > Department of life Sciences
Depositing User: Mr Mugisha Kafuma
Date Deposited: 06 May 2021 09:12
Last Modified: 06 May 2021 09:12
URI: http://repository.out.ac.tz/id/eprint/2851

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